SEL Tips

Tips to help you use social & emotional learning strategies to build skills and strengthen your classroom community every day. Sign up for our newsletter to get new tips as we create them.

August 31, 2017

Begin by asking students, "What do you need to feel safe, comfortable, and excited to learn?"

June 28, 2017

Instead of jumping ahead to brainstorming solutions, first explore why a problem is occurring.

May 9, 2017

Encouraging students to use put-ups can improve the climate in your classroom. But many put-ups are about surface qualities. (I like your shoes!) Help students craft deeper put-ups with these simple steps.
 

April 18, 2017

Once your students have identified their personal anger triggers, have them share those triggers with each other. This can foster empathy, increase students' awareness of themselves and others, and reduce conflicts.

March 20, 2017

Sometimes students become aware only later, after reflection, that they could have handled a situation in a better way. Lay the groundwork for students to request a "do-over" so they can address a mistake or misunderstanding after the fact.

February 14, 2017

Students are often stumped when it comes to finding a resolution to a conflict beyond saying “I’m sorry.” To get over this hump, encourage students to take two additional steps: Ask creative questions to understand the other person’s needs, and make a written commitment to change. 

January 20, 2017

"I Messages" are a great SEL tool for conveying our emotional needs. But sometimes they can be used to make accusations. We can prevent that from happening with this simple tweak in the I Message format. 

December 20, 2016

Young people can be active allies to someone who is being targeted without directly engaging with the aggressor. Help students learn a safer, non-confrontational way to be an ally: the "Join Us Intervention."

November 5, 2016

Deep learning often begins when students start applying the social and emotional skills you’re teaching to real-life problems.Try setting up a space in your classroom where students can cool down, resolve conflicts, and put their new skills to use.

October 26, 2016

Instead of stepping in to resolve a student's problem, try simply paraphrasing the student's point of view. Sometimes this is all it takes to calm a student down so that they can solve the problem on their own.